Wearable sensor analyzes sweat to monitor health

February 01, 2016 //By Paul Buckley
Wearable sensor analyzes sweat to monitor health
Engineers at UC Berkeley (Berkeley, CA) have developed a flexible sensor system designed to measure metabolites and electrolytes in sweat, calibrate the data based upon skin temperature, and sync the results in real time to a smartphone.

The researchers claim that the device, which reported in the journal Nature, is the first fully integrated electronic system to provide continuous, non-invasive monitoring of multiple biochemicals in sweat. The advance opens doors to wearable devices that alert users to health problems such as fatigue, dehydration, and dangerously high body temperatures.

"Human sweat contains physiologically rich information, thus making it an attractive body fluid for non-invasive wearable sensors," says study principal investigator Ali Javey, a UC Berkeley professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences.

"However, sweat is complex and it is necessary to measure multiple targets to extract meaningful information about your state of health. In this regard, we have developed a fully integrated system that simultaneously and selectively measures multiple sweat analytes, and wirelessly transmits the processed data to a smartphone. Our work presents a technology platform for sweat-based health monitors."

Javey worked with study co-lead authors Wei Gao and Sam Emaminejad, both of whom are postdoctoral fellows in his lab. Emaminejad also has a joint appointment at the Stanford School of Medicine, and all three have affiliations with the Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center and the Materials Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

To help design the sweat sensor system, Javey and his team consulted exercise physiologist George Brooks, a UC Berkeley professor of integrative biology.

"Having a wearable sweat sensor is really incredible because the metabolites and electrolytes measured by the Javey device are vitally important for the health and well-being of an individual," says Brooks, a co-author on the study. "When studying the effects of exercise on human physiology, we typically take blood samples. With this non-invasive technology, someday it may be possible to know what's going on physiologically without needle sticks or attaching little, disposable cups on you."

The prototype developed by Javey and his research team packs five sensors onto a flexible circuit board. The sensors measure the metabolites glucose and lactate, the electrolytes sodium and potassium, and skin temperature.


The new sensor developed at UC Berkeley can be made into "smart" wristbands or headbands that provide continuous, real-time analysis of the chemicals in sweat. (UC Berkeley photo by Wei Gao)

"The integrated system allows us to use the measured skin temperature to calibrate and adjust the readings of other sensors in real time," says Gao. "This is important because the response of glucose and lactate sensors can be greatly influenced by temperature."


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