Thinner wafers will slash solar cells costs, say MIT researchers: Page 2 of 2

January 27, 2020 //By Julien Happich
solar cells
Although solar panel costs have plummeted lately thanks to volume production and increased adoption, slimming down silicon wafers could lead to even lower costs and faster industry expansion, according to new research from MIT scientists.

The study looked at the efficiency levels of four variations of solar cell architecture, including PERC (passivated emitter and rear contact) cells and other advanced high-efficiency technologies, comparing their outputs at different thickness levels. The team found there was in fact little decline in performance down to thicknesses as low as 40 micrometers, using today’s improved manufacturing processes.

The analysis shows that, although changing over the huge panel-manufacturing plants to adapt to the thinner wafers will be a time-consuming and expensive process, the benefits could far outweigh the costs. In the future, the thickness could potentially be reduced to as little as 15 micrometers, thanks to technologies that grow thin wafers of silicon crystal directly rather than slicing them from a larger cylinder. Development of thin silicon has received little attention in recent years because the price of silicon has declined from its earlier peak. But, because of cost reductions that have already taken place in solar cell efficiency and other parts of the solar panel manufacturing process and supply chain, the cost of the silicon is once again a factor that can make a difference, the authors highlight.

“Efficiency can only go up by a few percent. So if you want to get further improvements, thickness is the way to go,” Buonassisi says. But the conversion will require large capital investments for full-scale deployment.

The purpose of this study, he says, is to provide a roadmap for those who may be planning expansion in solar manufacturing technologies. By making the path “concrete and tangible,” he says, it may help companies incorporate this in their planning. “There is a path,” he says. “It’s not easy, but there is a path. And for the first movers, the advantage is significant.”

MIT – www.mit.edu


Vous êtes certain ?

Si vous désactivez les cookies, vous ne pouvez plus naviguer sur le site.

Vous allez être rediriger vers Google.