Power system sensor detects imminent electrical failures

March 25, 2019 //By Nick Flaherty
MIT Power system sensor detects imminent electrical failures
Researchers at MIT have developed a system that can monitor the behavior of all electric devices within a building, ship, or factory, determining which ones are in use at any given time and whether any are showing signs of an imminent failure.

The new sensor, whose readings can be monitored on an easy-to-use graphic display called a NILM (non-intrusive load monitoring) dashboard uses a simple sensor that is attached to the outside of an electrical wire at a single point, without requiring any cutting or splicing of wires.

From that single point, it can sense the flow of current in the adjacent wire, and detect the distinctive "signatures" of each motor, pump, or piece of equipment in the circuit by analyzing tiny, unique fluctuations in the voltage and current whenever a device switches on or off. The system can also be used to monitor energy usage, to identify possible efficiency improvements and determine when and where devices are in use or sitting idle.

The technology is especially well-suited for relatively small, contained electrical systems such as those serving a small ship, building, or factory with a limited number of devices to monitor. In a series of tests on a Coast Guard cutter based in Boston, the system provided a dramatic demonstration last year

When tested on a Coast Guard cutter, the system pinpointed a motor with burnt-out wiring that could have led to a serious on-board fire. Around 20 different motors and devices were being tracked by a single dashboard, connected to two different sensors, on the cutter USCGC Spencer.

The sensors, which in this case had a hard-wired connection, showed that an anomalous amount of power was being drawn by a component of the ship's main diesel engines called a jacket water heater. At that point, Leeb says, crewmembers were skeptical about the reading but went to check it anyway. The heaters are hidden under protective metal covers, but as soon as the cover was removed from the suspect device, smoke came pouring out, and severe corrosion and broken insulation were clearly revealed.

"The ship is complicated," said MIT professor of electrical engineering Steven Leeb. "It's magnificently run and maintained, but nobody


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