Metal corrosion sensor fits on printed circuit boards

September 04, 2019 //By Rich Pell
Metal corrosion sensor fits on printed circuit boards
Mitsubishi Electric (Tokyo, Japan) has announced that it has developed what it claims is the world's first metal corrosion sensor small enough to be mounted on printed circuit boards.

Using metal corrosion monitoring technology developed by the company, the new sensor detects the degree of corrosion of metal components caused by corrosive gases such as sulfur compounds in the atmosphere. The deployment of multiple sensors with different levels of corrosion resistance, says the company, allows the degree of corrosion to be detected in stages, helping to prevent equipment failure.

Measuring 1.6 mm x 0.8 mm, the sensor incorporates a thin metal film and resistors and can be mounted directly on printed circuit boards. It is easily deployable across a wide range of products, such as industrial equipment, the company says, and by detecting conditions more closely matching the environment inside the equipment, the sensor can eliminate the need to install additional measuring instruments such as external sensors.

When metals are exposed to corrosive gases in the atmosphere, corrosion progresses from the surface to the inside and turns into rust. Since the electrical resistance of rust is tens of thousands of times higher than that of metal, the progress of any corrosion can be gauged by measuring the increase in electrical resistance of the corrosion sensors.

The initial resistance of the corrosion sensors can be adjusted by changing the composition and thickness of their metal content without changing the size of the sensor. The deployment of multiple sensors with different levels of corrosion resistance, says the company, allows the degree of corrosion to be detected in stages, helping to prevent equipment failure.

The company says that it plans to deploy the new technology across its own industrial equipment portfolio.

Mitsubishi Electric

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