Laser-induced graphene nanogenerators could power future wearables: Page 2 of 2

June 03, 2019 //By Nick Flaherty
Rice University postdoctoral researcher Michael Stanford holds a flip-flop with a triboelectric nanogenerator, based on laser-induced graphene, attached to the heel. Walking with the flip-flop generates electricity with repeated contact between the generator and the wearer’s skin. Stanford wired the device to store energy on a capacitor. Photo by Jeff Fitlow
Researchers have used a new formulation of graphene to create a generator that uses the static electricity from movement to create power.

The best configuration, with electrodes of the polyimide-LIG composite and aluminum, produced voltages above 3.5 kilovolts with a peak power of 8mW. “The nanogenerator embedded within a flip-flop was able to store 0.22 millijoules of electrical energy on a capacitor after a 1-kilometer walk,” said Rice postdoctoral researcher Michael Stanford, lead author of the paper. “This rate of energy storage is enough to power wearable sensors and electronics with human movement.”

www.rice.edu

Lab video demonstrates that repeatedly hitting a folded triboelectric generator produced enough energy to power a series of attached light-emitting diodes. The test showed how generators based on laser-induced graphene could be used to power wearable sensors and electronics with human movement. Courtesy of the Tour Group

LIQUID METAL HARVESTS ENERGY FROM MOVEMENT
WORK TO BOOST STATIC ELECTRICITY TO DRIVE ELECTRONICS
NANOMATERIALS HARNESS FRICTION TO CHARGE MOBILE PHONES
NANOGENERATOR HARVESTS ENERGY FROM ROLLING TIRES
TWO-STAGE POWER MANAGEMENT SOLUTION BOOSTS ENERGY-HARVESTING EFFICIENCY

 

 


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