'Brain-on-a-chip' contains tens of thousands of memristors: Page 3 of 3

June 10, 2020 //By Julien Happich
memristor
Researchers from MIT have engineered tens of thousands of artificial brain synapses on a silicon chip a few square millimeters in size.

Engineers typically use silver as the material for a memristor's positive electrode. Kim's team looked through the literature to find an element that they could combine with silver to effectively hold silver ions together, while allowing them to flow quickly through to the other electrode. The team landed on copper as the ideal alloying element, as it is able to bind both with silver, and with silicon. "It acts as a sort of bridge, and stabilizes the silver-silicon interface," explains Kim.

To make memristors using their new alloy, the group first fabricated a negative electrode out of silicon, then made a positive electrode by depositing a slight amount of copper, followed by a layer of silver. They sandwiched the two electrodes around an amorphous silicon medium. In this way, they patterned a millimeter-square silicon chip with tens of thousands of memristors.

As a first test of the chip, they recreated a gray-scale image of the Captain America shield. They equated each pixel in the image to a corresponding memristor in the chip. They then modulated the conductance of each memristor that was relative in strength to the color in the corresponding pixel. The chip produced the same crisp image of the shield, and was able to "remember" the image and reproduce it many times, compared with chips made of other materials.


A close-up view of a new neuromorphic “brain-on-a-chip”
that includes tens of thousands of memristors, or memory
transistors. Credit: Peng Lin.

The team also ran the chip through an image processing task, programming the memristors to alter an image, in this case of MIT's Killian Court, in several specific ways, including sharpening and blurring the original image. Again, their design produced the reprogrammed images more reliably than existing memristor designs.

"We're using artificial synapses to do real inference tests," Kim says. "We would like to develop this technology further to have larger-scale arrays to do image recognition tasks. And some day, you might be able to carry around artificial brains to do these kinds of tasks, without connecting to supercomputers, the internet, or the cloud."

MIT - www.mit.edu


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