3D-printed brain-sensing headset is open source

3D-printed brain-sensing headset is open source

Brain biosensing startup OpenBCI (Brooklyn, NY) has returned to Kickstarter with an affordable, open-source 3D-printed EEG headset and development board that can be used to study patterns of brain activity.
By eeNews Europe

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Last year, Joel Murphy and Conor Russomanno successfully completed a Kickstarter campaign for their OpenBCI (open-source Brain-computer interface) – a low-cost, programmable, open-source EEG platform that anyone could build to access to their brainwaves. The two founders justify their move to the open source movement as a necessity in order to lower the barrier to entry and accelerate research and discoveries in brain sciences.

This year, they are back with a more complete offering: the OpenBCI Ganglion, an improved biosensing board able to take inputs for EMG, ECG or EEG measurements, and a complete 3D-printable headset concept – the Ultracortex Mark III – capable of hosting over 60 electrodes for better EEG signal discrimination and analysis.

Although all the parts will be available for sale at the OpenBCI’s online shop, DIY makers can also access all the links to hardware printable CAD files from the company’s Github repository. The non-printable electronic parts can be sourced from the online shop.

By bringing brain-computer interfaces to the open-source community, Murphy and Russomanno hope that neurosciences and biosensing will reach far beyond academia, delivering neurofeedback tools at approximately a tenth the cost of research-grade devices while enabling new home-grown projects spanning all fields of application.

The new EEG headset kit starts at $450 and includes the Ganglion development board and the fourth version of their headset, the 3D-printed Ultracortex Mark IV. The Kickstarter campaign aims to raise at least $80,000 and ship products in July 2016.

OpenBCI Kickstarter page
OpenBCI: www.openbci.com

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