Single-junction solar cell breaks energy efficiency record

July 03, 2018 // By Nick Flaherty
Solar technology company Alta Devices (Sunnyvale, CA) has set a new record for the efficiency of single junction solar cells, achieving 28.9% for its flexible film technology.

The single-junction gallium arsendie (GaAs) module can be used to power a range of products from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and electric vehicles to smart sensors.

Alta Devices, a subsidiary of Chinese group Hanergy Thin Film Power, first broke the record for GaAs single-junction cells in 2010 and has since then broken five conversion efficiency records already, with the recent 28.9% figure rated as the highest efficiency in the world by US's National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

"Our latest milestone for utmost solar efficiency represents a breakthrough in Hanergy's vision for the future of solar energy applications," said Ding Jianru, CEO of Alta Devices. "We believe that with fast-tracking trend towards autonomous machines, it's highly imperative to have sources of power that can be replenished without the interruption. We're aligned with our goal to continue to produce thin-film solar batteries with efficiencies par-excellence to lead the progressing trend towards autonomous machines."

Last year, Hanergy collaborated with Audi on solar sunroof using GaAs thin film battery technology. Chinese automakers such as FAW and BAIC are also working with Hanergy to jointly develop GaAs thin-film solar roofs for multiple models. Meanwhile, Hanergy has also brought to use its GaAs thin film solar cells for drones to develop industrial-grade solar drones. Globally, Hanergy holds more than 4,500 patents in the field of thin film solar energy, of which about 50% are invention patents.

www.altadevices.com

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