Nvidia: Fully autonomous cars on the road in four years

October 27, 2017 // By Rich Pell
The CEO of chipmaker Nvidia (Santa Clara, CA) says that he believes artificial intelligence (AI) will enable fully autonomous cars within four years.

According to Reuters, Nvidia co-founder and CEO Jensen Huang made the statement when speaking with media after a company event in Taipei, Taiwan. At the same time, it's reported he tamped down expectations about a potential surge in demand for the company's graphics processing unit (GPU) chips from cryptocurrency miners.

"It will take no more than four years to have fully autonomous cars on the road," Huang said. "How long it takes for the vast majority of cars on the road to become that, it really just depends."

Nvidia recently unveiled its NVIDIA DRIVE PX Pegasus platform for fully autonomous "robo taxis." The company, along with other processing chip makers like Intel, has been partnering with car makers and suppliers to advance AI and deep learning technology in autonomous cars. Some of its automaker partners include Toyota, Audi, Tesla, Mercedes-Benz, BMW, Honda, and Volvo.

On the topic of cryptocurrency mining - excitement for which is behind some of the recent surge in the stock prices of Nvidia and AMD - Huang was less enthusiastic.

"Revenue for us in crypto is over $100 million a quarter," he said. "For us, it's a small percentage... It's obviously not a target market."

AMD also recently indicated that it saw cryptocurrency-related demand "leveling-off" from its recent torrid pace. However, AMD CEO Lisa Su did note that the commercial blockchain component was interesting and "likely to continue into the medium term."

Nvidia
AMD

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Nvidia to launch cryptocurrency mining graphics cards


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